“What the hell was that?”

It’s a question frequently asked in the paranormal community, usually when something unexpected happens during an investigation or during analysis of data collected. Always in search of the truth, there usually are more questions than answers.

The last few years, reality shows of investigators or “ghost hunters,” if you will, seeking evidence of the paranormal has become very popular. Many paranormal groups have popped up all over the country. There are several in the Golden Triangle area.

Then there are those people who are very curious about the afterlife, but not adventurous enough to investigate for themselves, or have a fear of the unknown. For those individuals, the Texas Ghost Show is scheduled for March 13 at the Beaumont Civic Center. It will give the general public the opportunity to hear first hand from investigators featured on some of their favorite shows and authors of books on the subject.

Hosted by the Texas Society of Paranormal Investigators (TSPI), the Texas Ghost Show has been a year in the planning. Speakers slated for the event includes one of the “newest kids on the block,” Brad Klinge of “Ghost Lab.” Klinge started Everyday Paranormal in 2007 after spending 17 years collecting evidence on his own. In the fall the Discovery Channel started airing the “Ghost Lab” series.
Also on the slate of speakers are Brian Harnois from “Ghost Hunter” and Ghost Hunters International,” Cryptozoologist Ken Gerhard, Father Andrew Calder from “Paranormal State,”  “Oprah of the Paranormal” Ericka Boussarhane, “Ghost Man of Galveston” Dash Beardsley, Author Dr. Rita Louise and more. Ghostology’s Brian and Anna Marie will emcee the show.

Booths include Museum of the Weird, aura photography, several paranormal groups, representatives from Yorktown and the Pride House in Jefferson, wire wrapped jewelry, Only One Vases, Enlightened Spiritual Solutions, Golden Triangle Body Mind Spirit Connection, massage by the minute and Sertinos will be on hand with lattes and cappuccinos.
Tickets are only $20. The doors open at 8 a.m. Presenters speak from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.  The Beaumont Civic Center is located at 701 Main St., Beaumont.

A special room rate of $79 is available at the MCM Elegante’ with code TXSPI. For more information call Don Dennis at (409) 553-4456 or go to txparanormal.com

A limited number of Texas Ghost Show tickets and $5 raffle tickets can be purchased at the Orange office of The Record Newspapers at 320 Henrietta on Mon., Tue. and Fri.

A quick Q & A with Brad Klinge

Q. When and why did you start studying the paranormal?
A. In July of 1990, I was on a family vacation in Gettysburg (me, my mom and dad).  I was 17 years old.  On our way out of town after being there a few days, I noticed a group of 10-15 Union soldiers walking aimlessly in an open field.  I thought they were doing a reenactment.  This was broad daylight and clear blue skies around noon that day.  I asked my dad to pull over and I jumped out and started to run towards them.  They were about 100 yards in front of me.  Flags flying, I could see the drums slung over the backs of a few of them, rifles, the whole shebang.  I stop with them about 75 yards in front of me and I pan the camera from right to left–catching them in focus for a couple of seconds as I panned.  I wanted to get closer so I put the camera down and start to run again.  As soon as I looked up, they were gone.  They would have had to move 300 yards in two seconds to be out of my sight.  I looked all over…nothing.  Then I noticed I was out there by myself.  If it was a reenactment, there would have been other actors, there would have been crowds of spectators, but there was nothing.  The only thing I remember at that point was the sound of the breeze going through the grass.  I quickly looked back at the replay of my tape.  Sure enough, I caught them in view when I panned across.  At that moment, I knew ghosts existed.  This was now my personal proof of the paranormal, but I knew that since this was so real, there had to be a scientific explanation of how ghosts manifested.  So 17 years later in 2007 and after 17 years of personal research, I formed Everyday Paranormal to go out and put into practice all of the methods and theories I had devised over the years.  It was very successful, and gained a lot of attention quickly because it was so simple, logical, but yet outside of the box.

Q. What’s the most unusual or startling piece of evidence you’ve recorded to date?
A. Everything is startling in its own way.  Obviously, the Gettysburg soldiers were the most vivid.  We have caught photographs of solid human forms as if someone was in the room with you such as what we call “The French Guy” at the Institute of Texan Cultures in SA or “the bartender” at the Harlequin Theater in SA.  We have clear, vaporous shadow forms of children moving in and out of a bedroom at the Myrtles.  We caught a chair moving on video.  We caught a shadow person on thermal that allowed us to study the temperature phenomenon associated with paranormal activity.  Our library is quite extensive.

Q. What effect has reality TV had on your investigations?
A. We never looked to be on television.  Television found us.  Discovery Channel is very reputable and known for its science and educational programs, and it was an honor to be selected by them to represent them through our high standards and scientific mind-set.  But it was a little different at first.  You just have to be used to extra people like cameramen, audio guys, producers, and everyone else necessary to film a TV show in your investigations with you.  We simply look at them as additional investigators with additional equipment.  They are literally flies on the wall, and once you establish a good chemistry with your crew, they fit the investigation like gloves.  There have been many instances where their equipment has actually captured evidence.  There have been times where we have been able to review their camera angles to debunk what looked to be paranormal–almost like the NFL instant replay booth!  What people need to realize is that over 100 hours of video and audio footage go into each episode which is only 42 minutes long after commercials.  That is a lot of stuff that has to get whittled down to fit in the time slot but also making sure the integrity of what you are doing is maintained.  Some really cool evidence that we get is never seen on television, but we still use it in our research.  I think television has actually made us better investigators.  You really have to be on your toes.

About Penny LeLeux

Penny has worked at The Record Newspapers since 2006. A member of the editorial staff, she has "done everything but print it." Most frequently she writes entertainment reviews and human interest stories, with a little paranormal thrown in from time to time.She has been a lifelong member of the Orangefield community.