Modified C-130 cargo planes, like the one above, will continue flying low over Orange County, spraying for mosquitos, the next two nights.

According to the State Department of Health Services, Saturday’s first night of spraying covered 102,000 acres over Jefferson and Orange counties. The effort is in response the record rainfall and resulting flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

The planes, staged out at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, belong to the U.S. Air Force Reserve’s 910th Airlift Wing. They expect to be working over Jefferson, Orange and Chambers counties for at least the next two nights before moving on other parts of the region.

A total of approximately 857,000 acres have been sprayed across the Coastal Bend area and upper Gulf Coast.

The goal is to reduce the effects mosquitoes are having on recovery efforts and the possibility of a future increase in mosquito-borne disease. During aerial spraying, a small amount of insecticide is sprayed over a large area, one to two tablespoons per acre. When applied according to label instructions by a licensed professional, it does not pose a health risk to people, pets or the environment.

According to the EPA, people may prefer to stay inside and close windows and doors when spraying takes place, but it is not necessary.

Residents need to take measures to protect themselves from mosquito bites and mosquito-borne diseases by using EPA approved repellants.

Other tips: move indoors at dusk and dawn when many mosquito species are most active; wear light colored loose fitting clothing as a physical barrier from the mosquito; drain standing water from property.